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ESPN reporter and cancer survivor receives a very public emotional tribute

​ESPN reporter Holly Rowe, who continued to work while battling melanoma, received a surprise tribute during the Jan. 20 Baylor-Oklahoma baskeball game in Waco, Texas.

Before the start of the second half, broadcasters, coaches, players, and fans participated in a tribute organized by Coaches vs. Cancer. They held up signs with the words "I Fight For" on them, on which they had written the names of loved ones. Many of them had written Holly's name on their card, including ESPN broadcasters Fran Fraschilla and Bob Wschusen. Holly's reaction is what you would expect.

Watch here.

Read more about her cancer journey.

This week, Jan. 20 - Jan. 26, is Coaches vs. Cancer Suits And Sneakers Week, when NABC coaches trade in their dress shoes for sneakers to raise awareness about the fight against cancer. This season, Suits And Sneakers games will support childhood cancer research, services, and awareness as well as promote cancer prevention efforts targeting children.

  • Two ACS videos up for Sharecare Awards - your action requested!

    Vote once a day to help us win!

    Two American Cancer Society videos have been selected as finalists for a Sharecare Award. Your votes can help bring home the “People’s Choice” award. The Sharecare Awards, in association with The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (The Emmy’s), honor excellence in health and wellness productions and programming.

    ACS is a finalist in three of 15 categories. Between now and Friday, Jan. 31, the public is invited to vote for their favorite, which will determine the winner of the 2020 People’s Choice Sharing Care Award. Each finalist’s submission is available for viewing at sharecareawards.org/voting, where people can cast their vote for one finalist in each category per day during this period.

    ACS is a finalist in the behavioral health category for the Caregiver Self-Care: Stress Management video that is a part of our Caregiver Support series, written by ACS and produced by Dan Hodlick, ACS Studios. The goal of this 16-part series is to provide educational support to caregivers as they assist with the everyday physical care needs of cancer patients and provide self-care techniques to improve their quality of life. Please visit this site to vote for the caregiver video. 

    In the cancer and innovation category, Virtual Reality for Pediatric Cancer Patients, a video written by ACS and produced by Zuza Films, showcases an innovative, relevant, and impactful virtual reality experience that allows kids going through treatment at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta to get a respite from the pain and anxiety caused by treatment protocols. For more than 20 years, virtual reality simulations have been used in a clinical setting as a method of distraction to help address anxiety, pain, and the loss of control people feel during painful medical procedures. Please visit the cancer category and the innovation category to vote for this video. 

    Remember, you can vote once in each category each day from now until Jan. 31!

    Finalists and winners for each category will be honored at the 2020 Sharecare Awards event on Thursday, March 26, in Atlanta.


  • ACS Ambassador NeNe Leakes on Dr. Oz

    The star of The Real Housewives of Atlanta discusses caregiving

    ACS Ambassador NeNe Leakes and her husband Gregg, a colon cancer survivor, discussed the stress of caregiving on The Dr. Oz Show on Jan. 17. 

    Watch and share this poignant and funny 7-minute segment, which includes a look at a healthy colon and a colon with cancer. Dr. Oz shares a recipe for a "colon health smoothie," discusses risk factors, and stresses the importance of getting screened for colon cancer. 

    The beginning of the segment features a clip of NeNe and Gregg's caregiver video that can be found among our caregiver video resources on cancer.org (scroll way down on the page). In it, NeNe says "being a caregiver is one of the hardest jobs . . . I was very stressed out."

    NeNe is best known for appearing on the reality television series The Real Housewives of Atlanta as an original cast member, and for her recurring character Roz Washington on the Fox comedy-drama series Glee

    She also played Rocky Rhoades as a series regular on the sitcom The New Normal on NBC until its cancellation in 2013. She has also participated on NBC's The Celebrity Apprentice and ABC's Dancing with the Stars. She made her Broadway debut as Madame in Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella in 2014 and in 2015 played Matron "Mama" Morton in Chicago. She also had a clothing line on Home Shopping Network before launching her SWAGG boutiques in select cities across the country.


  • Expert shares how ACS can use design thinking to advance health equity

    Recording of webcast now available for volunteers and staff

     A recording of a livestream event in January is now available for volunteers and staff who are interested in advancing health equity and social change using design thinking principles. The 50-minute webcast features George Aye, a nationally-renowned leader in design thinking and social sector innovation. 

    Design thinking encourages organizations to focus on the unmet needs of the people they serve by employing empathy, ideation, and experimentation in their services, products, policies, and strategies. This presentation will help volunteers and staff uncover hidden opportunities for innovation in their daily work, shape positive change, and advance health equity. 

    ACS and ACS CAN are intentionally integrating health equity principles into our research, programs, services, and advocacy through a 3-year grant with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

    If you would like more information about this webcast or to learn more about how ACS and ACS CAN are advancing health equity, please email the Health Equity Team at healthequity@cancer.org.



  • Changes coming to Artwork Builder - action required

    Scroll down to find the full schedule.

    During the first half of 2020, Artwork Builder will be moving from Flash to HTML5. As a result, all Artwork Builder templates will be migrated over to the new format on a rolling schedule created to cause the least disruption to end-users. A copy of the schedule is included below.

    As part of this change, the Marketing team will take the opportunity to revamp and improve some of the template offerings for programs like golf and galas.

    What does this mean for Artwork Builder end-users? 

    • Prior to the program migration dates, end-users are strongly encouraged to complete all in-progress work they have in Artwork Builder and download the PDF to their computers. In-progress work is expected to be migrated over but, as a precaution, please complete and save your work.

    • There will also be Artwork Builder blackout dates leading up to each program migration. During the blackout dates, templates and saved artwork for that program will not be available

    • Please share this important update with any external users you work with.

    This change applies to Artwork Builder templates only and does not impact Brand Toolkit assets. If you have questions, please send them to Brandtoolkit@cancer.org.

    Tentative Migration Schedule

    Program of Work

    Last day to complete work in progress and download PDF's

    Blackout dates (templates and saved artwork not available)

    Templates available again

    RMWP

    1/26/20

    1/27/20 - 2/2/20

    2/3/20

    MSABC

    1/26/20

    1/27/20 - 2/2/20

    2/3/20

    Golf

    2/23/20

    2/24/20-3/1/20

    3/2/20

    5K

    3/29/20

    3/30/20-4/5/20

    4/6/20

    Corporate Partners

    3/29/20

    3/30/20-4/5/20

    4/6/20

    ACS Regional Communication Materials

    3/29/20

    3/30/20-4/5/20

    4/6/20

    Laureate Society 

    3/29/20

    3/30/20-4/5/20

    4/6/20

    Patient Services

    4/26/20

    4/27/20-5/3/20

    5/4/20

    Co-branded Screening Reminders Postcards 

    4/26/20

    4/27/20-5/3/20

    5/4/20

    GASO

    4/26/20

    4/27/20-5/3/20

    5/4/20

    Cancer Control Flyers

    4/26/20

    4/27/20-5/3/20

    5/4/20

    Cancer Control Posters

    4/26/20

    4/27/20-5/3/20

    5/4/20

    Cancer Control Postcards

    4/26/20

    4/27/20-5/3/20

    5/4/20

    CvC

    4/26/20

    4/27/20-5/3/20

    5/4/20

    Discovery Shop

    5/24/20

    5/25/20-5/31/20

    6/1/20

    DetermiNation

    5/24/20

    5/25/20-5/31/20

    6/1/20

    Gala

    5/24/20

    5/25/20-5/31/20

    6/1/20

    ACS General

    5/24/20

    5/25/20-5/31/20

    6/1/20

    Hope Lodge

    5/24/20

    5/25/20-5/31/20

    6/1/20

    RFL

    6/28/20

    6/29/20-7/5/20

    7/6/20

    Gold Together

    6/28/20

    6/29/20-7/5/20

    7/6/20

     



  • Gary Reedy issues statement after President takes credit for decline in cancer deaths

    Our CEO urges President to increase access to comprehensive health care and support evidence-based tobacco control policies

    In the wake of our release of Cancer Statistics, 2020 and Cancer Facts & Figures 2020, President Donald Trump issued a tweet in which he said: "U.S. Cancer Death Rate Lowest In Recorded History! A lot of good news coming out of this Administration."

    In a written statement, Gary Reedy, our CEO, said the following: 

    "The mortality trends reflected in our current report, including the largest drop in overall cancer mortality ever recorded from 2016 to 2017, reflect prevention, early detection, and treatment advances that occurred in prior years.

    "Since taking office, the president has signed multiple spending bills that have included increases in funding for cancer research at the National Institutes of Health and National Cancer Institute -- though the impact of those increases are not reflected in the data contained in this report.

    "The administration has an opportunity to significantly impact future declines in both cancer incidence and mortality by increasing access to comprehensive health care, supporting robust and sustained increases in federal funding for cancer research, and passing and implementing evidence-based tobacco control policies."

    You can read a CNN story about this. CNN was the first news organization to contact us for a response to the President's remark.


  • The Young and the Restless launch a breast cancer storyline with help from ACS

    J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD, MACP, our deputy chief medical officer, has been reviewing the medical content for accuracy

    On the Jan. 9 episode of The Young and the Restless, CBS’ most watched daytime drama, the character played by actress Sharon Case shared with her boyfriend that she has breast cancer. It will be the support from Sharon’s family and friends in the coming weeks that help her remain positive, according to an article on soaps.com.

    "The Young and the Restless approached us to do a breast cancer storyline, which will run from January through October, Breast Cancer Awareness Month," said Kathi Di Nicola, director of media relations, the lead on this project.

    She said Dr. Len has been reviewing the medical content to make sure it’s medically and scientifically accurate. "The show will feature our website and some of our materials over the next ten months. Other aspects of the partnership are still being finalized, but it’s a great relationship for us and meaningful exposure, reaching 175 million viewers a year with accurate information about breast cancer signs, treatments, and more," Kathi explained.

    The Young and the Restless, now in its 47th season, has tackled important issues, such as AIDS, alcoholism, and domestic abuse. There will be a public service announcement (PSA) from CBS Cares and the American Cancer Society that will feature Sharon Case prominently at the end of the January 9 episode. CBS Cares produces television PSAs that usually feature performers from CBS Television Network programming.  

    Congrats to Kathi, as well as staff in marketing, social media, Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, and others, who are helping make this happen!


  • January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

    Regular screening and HPV vaccination will prevent most cervical cancers

    January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Cervical cancer tends to occur in midlife, and is most frequently diagnosed between the ages of 34 and 44. 

    This month, ACS wants to raise awareness that cervical cancer is a highly preventable and treatable cancer. Regular screening with a Pap and HPV test and HPV vaccination will prevent most cervical cancers. 

    The ACS has guidelines to help find pre-cancers, which can be treated to keep cervical cancer from forming. Following these guidelines can also find cervical cancer early:

    • All women should begin cervical cancer testing (screening) at age 21. Women aged 21 to 29 should have a Pap test every 3 years. 

    • Beginning at age 30, the preferred way to screen is with a Pap test combined with an HPV test every 5 years. This is called co-testing, and should continue until age 65.

    • Another reasonable option for women 30 to 65 is to get tested every 3 years with just the Pap test.

    • Women who are at high risk of cervical cancer because of a suppressed immune system (for example from HIV infection, organ transplant, or long-term steroid use) or because their mother took the drug DES when she was pregnant with them, may need to be screened more often. They should follow the recommendations of their health care team.

    • Women over 65 years of age who have had regular screening in the previous 10 years should stop cervical cancer screening as long as they haven’t had any serious pre-cancers found in the last 20 years. 

    • Women who have had a total hysterectomy (removal of the uterus and cervix) should stop screening with Pap tests and HPV tests, unless the hysterectomy was done as a treatment for cervical pre-cancer or cancer. Women who have had a hysterectomy without removal of the cervix (called a supra-cervical hysterectomy) should continue cervical cancer screening according to the guidelines above.

    • Women of any age should NOT be screened every year by any screening method.

    • Women who have been vaccinated against HPV should still follow these guidelines.

    The most important risk factor that increases a woman’s chance of cervical cancer is HPV infection. To prevent HPV, the ACS recommends HPV vaccination for girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 12 or starting at age 9. Girls and boys who do not get the vaccine at the recommended age should still get the HPV vaccination until age 26. 

    For more information, visit cancer.org/hpv.


  • It’s never too late to quit smoking; ACS resources can help

    ​January is a time when people – as many as 40 percent of Americans – make New Year’s resolutions around changing their health behaviors. 

    More than five in 10 people who smoke tried to quit in the last 12 months, and many people use the new year as a time to kick the habit. The American Cancer Society is ready to help with tools and materials. Help spread the message to someone you love that it is never too late to quit smoking. 

    ACS understands that quitting smoking is a process, and that success may look different for different people. We can provide support, from answering questions about quitting smoking to identifying national or local resources. To find out more, visit cancer.org/howtoquit or call 1-800-227-2345

    You are encouraged to help those you love by sharing these resources directly or through your personal social media channels. In addition to our website cancer.org, ACS has two pieces posted on Brand Toolkit that you can share with those who are trying to quit smoking: 

    • Set yourself free quit smoking guide available in English and Spanish

    • You can quit smoking flyer – bilingual (English and Spanish)

    We do not encourage the use of e-cigarettes to quit smoking. No e-cigarette has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a safe and effective cessation product. All tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, pose a risk to the health of the user. 

    Tobacco use remains the most preventable cause of death in the U.S., and is a risk factor for 13 cancers. Between 38-40 million adults still smoke cigarettes. 

    ACS can make the biggest impact in reducing cancer mortality by promoting and supporting people in their quit attempts. Since we know that quitting smoking doesn’t always happen in one try or at one time of year, ACS resources and support are available year-round.  

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